ALL MOVIES ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Thursday 5PM screenings will be introduced by French culture and film specialists and followed by a discussion with the audience.

Thursday 1/31
5 PM & 8 PM
Saturday 2/2

2 PM
FLOYD THEATER

Thursday 2/7
5 PM & 8 PM
Saturday 2/9

2 PM
FLOYD THEATER

Thursday 2/14
5 PM & 8 PM
Saturday 2/16
2 PM
FLOYD THEATER

Sunday 2/17
12:30 PM
SPEED CINEMA
Sponsored by the Speed Art Museum

Tuesday 2/19
8 PM
FLOYD THEATER

Sponsored by F.L.U.

Thursday 2/15
5 PM & 8 PM
Saturday 2/23

2 PM
FLOYD THEATER

Sunday 2/24
1 PM
SPEED CINEMA
Sponsored by the Speed Art Museum

Thursday 2/28
5 PM & 8 PM
Saturday 3/2
2 PM
FLOYD THEATER

ABOUT THE FILMS

The Outsider (L’Outsider) – Christophe Barratier (2016)
Thursday 1/31 5PM AND 8PM, Saturday 2/2 2PM Floyd Theater

Discussion
Facilitator: Wendy Yoder, French professor, UofL 
[Thursday, 5 pm screening]

Before the subprime mortgage crisis began unfolding in 2008, causing chaos in world markets and misery among millions of homeowners, another financial apocalypse was already underway at Société Générale, one of France’s most prestigious banks. It was caused by just one man: a young trader named Jérôme Kerviel. Hired as a simple clerk at the bank, Kerviel became the star of the trading floor, nicknamed “the cash machine” by his colleagues. When all was said and done, Société Générale suffered a loss of 4.9 billion euros and Kerviel was fired, sued, arrested and imprisoned, becoming the most famous Frenchman to ever sit in front of a Bloomberg terminal and pay the price for it. 

Peppermint Soda (Diabolo Menthe) by Diane Kurys, 1977
Thursday 2/7, 5 pm and 8 pm and Saturday 2/9, 2 pm – Floyd Theater

Discussion
Facilitator : Tracy Heightchew, Louisville Free Public Library 
[Thursday, 5 pm screening]

In the vein of such classic coming of age films as Francois Truffaut’s The 400 Blows, Diane Kurys’s Peppermint Soda captures a particular moment in the tumultuous life and development of young people. Anne (Eléonore Klarwein) and Frédérique (Odile Michel) are sisters entering their teen years in 1963 France, torn between divorced parents and struggling with the confines of their strict school. Along the way, they undergo an awakening both political and romantic. Kurys’s celebrated film revels in the comedy and tragedy of the seemingly mundane, weaving a complex tapestry of everyday existence that also touches on the universal. 

Gaspard at the Wedding (Gaspard va au mariage) by Antony Cordier, 2017
Thursday 2/14, 5 pm and 8 pm and Saturday 2/16, 2 pm – Floyd Theater

Discussion
Facilitator: Mary Greenwood, French professor, UofL 
[Thursday, 5 pm screening]

After many years of keeping a careful distance, Gaspard, 25, has to reconnect with his family when his father announces he is getting remarried. Accompanied by Laura, an eccentric girl who agrees to play the role of his girlfriend for the wedding, he finally feels ready to set foot again in his parents’ zoo, where he is reunited with the monkeys and tigers he grew up with. But between a father who is too much of a womanizer, a brother who is too square, and a sister who is far too beautiful, he is not aware that he is preparing to live the last days of his childhood. 

Maigret and the St. Fiacre Case (Maigret et l’affaire Saint-Fiacre) by Jean Delannoy, 1959
Sunday 2/17, 12:30 pm – Speed Cinema, In collaboration with Speed Museum

Discussion Facilitator: Matthieu Dalle, French professor, UofL 
[Thursday, 5 pm screening]

Georges Simenon’s inimitable Inspector Maigret (played by Jean Gabin) returns to his countryside hometown to investigate an ominous letter received by his old friend, the countess of St. Fiacre. The letter portends the countess’s death, and when a heart attack makes the harbinger come true, the good inspector suspects foul play. The mystery of Maigret and the St. Fiacre Case twists and turns like vines crawling up the countess’s chateau, culminating in an explosive finale that finds Maigret dropping by a dinner of which all the guests are suspects. 

Boy Meets Girl by Leos Carax, 1984
Tuesday 2/19, 8 pm – Floyd Theater, Collaboration with UofL’s Film Liberation Unit

Discussion Facilitator: Madelyn Carey and Maddie Harrington, Film Liberation Unit 

Paris by night. Alex, 22, wants to become a filmmaker. His girlfriend, Florence, has just left him for his best friend, Thomas. Alex tries to strangle Thomas, but gives up and wanders the streets. He witnesses the separation of Mireille, a girl from provincial France who has come up to Paris to make commercials, and her boyfriend. Later that evening, Alex and Mireille run into each other at a party. Boy Meets Girl displays the social uneasiness of young adults suffering from the torments of their waning teenage years, echoing director Leos Carax’s own blues and the disillusionment of the 1980s generation. 

The Workshop (L’Atelier) by Laurent Cantet, 2017
Thursday 2/21, 5 pm and 8 pm and Saturday 2/23, 2 pm – Floyd Theater

Discussion Facilitator : Matthieu Dalle, French professor, UofL 
[Thursday, 5 pm screening]

La Ciotat, in Southern France. Antoine attends a summer creative writing workshop in which several underprivileged young adults have been selected to write a crime thriller with the help of Olivia, a famous Parisian novelist. The creative process will recall the town’s industrial past, a form of nostalgia to which Antoine feels indifferent. More concerned with the fears of the modern world, the young man soon clashes with the group and Olivia, who seems at the same time alarmed and captivated by Antoine’s violence. 

The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales (Le Grand Méchant Renard et autres contes) by Benjamin Renner and Patrick Imbert, 2018
Sunday 2/24, 1 pm – Speed Cinema

The countryside isn’t always as calm and peaceful as it’s made out to be, and the animals on this farm are particularly agitated: a fox who mothers a family of chicks, a rabbit who plays the stork, and a duck who wants to be Santa Claus. If you think life in the country is a walk in the park, think again! Directors Benjamin Renner and Patrick Imbert adapt Renner’s own acclaimed graphic novel into a delirious, delightful triptych of interlocking stories, with a pacing and visual spontaneity that harkens back to classic Looney Tunes shorts. Underneath the gags (and there are plenty of them), the three stories offer a sensitive and beautiful portrayal of family, and the anxieties of modern life. 

The Sweet Escape (Comme un avion) by Bruno Podalydès, 2015
Thursday 2/28, 5 pm and 8 pm and Saturday 3/2, 2 pm – Floyd Theater

Discussion Facilitator: TBA 
[Thursday, 5 pm screening]

Michel, a middle-aged graphic designer, loves planes. Day and night, in the shower, at work, riding his scooter, he dreams of himself as an aviation pioneer. One day, the picture of a kayak stops him dead in his tracks. Kayaks are just like planes, albeit without wings. Seized by a sudden impulse, Michel orders the whole package online: a kayak, paddles, and all the equipment he needs for an expedition. His wife Rachelle encourages him to set out alone on his escapade. His big trip on the water turns out to be full of surprises and unexpected encounters. He meets Laetitia, the owner of a riverside bar, her crazy employees, and the young waitress Mila. After a night in their company, Michel finds it very hard to leave.

For more information, please contact: Matthieu Dalle – m.dalle@louisville.edu 

Paid parking at Floyd Street Garage and Speed Museum Garage: http://louisville.edu/parking/campus-maps/2018-19-parking-map-1


Thanks to our Sponsors:

Department of Classical and Modern Languages